Karl Lagerfeld, the creative mastermind behind Chanel and Fendi, passed away on Feb. 19 leaving his beloved cat Choupette behind.

Choupette could easily be described as one of the most spoiled pets in the world with two maids that care for her. Lagerfeld revealed in an interview with Numero that she has “four different dishes prepared for her” each day “served in fabulous bowls”.

Choupette would sit “opposite” Lagerfeld during meals and is brushed “four times a day”.

In another interview with Numero, Lagerfeld admitted that he left a vast portion of his estimated $200 million fortune to Choupette. But he added there are others, “don’t worry, there is enough for everyone.”

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Not that the kitty needs the money, she earned around $3 million from her sponsorship deals for Opel, a German car company and a cosmetic brand from Lagerfeld. As well as a book Choupette: The Private Life of a High-Flying Fashion Cat where she is pictured with top models.

Choupette has her own social media following which she shared the passing of “Daddy.”

Lagerfeld wished to be cremated, something he spoke to the magazine about. He asked for his “ashes to dispersed with those of my mother… and those of Choupette, if she dies before me.”

A wish a spokesperson said would be “respected.”

According to People, he would also like to have some of his ashes placed with his late partner, Jacques de Bascher with no ceremony.

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Lagerfeld kept the ashes of his mother and Bascher in a place only known to him. In a biography of Bascher, Lagerfeld wrote, “One day, we will add mine. But I do not want a burial, nothing. I arrived one day, and one day I will leave. But let it be said, there is no urgency. I am like Madame Porges, who lived during the Belle Epoque. When she died, people said that she was the only survivor of a world she was not part of. Well, me, that’s it, this world, I was not really part of it.”