Selena Gomez is lending her platform to an important voice.

On Wednesday, the singer handed over her Instagram account — and her 180 million followers — to politician and voting rights activist Stacey Abrams.

RELATED: Ruby Bridges Takes Over Selena Gomez’s Instagram, Shares Never Seen Before Footage From The Day She Integrated To An All-White School

Abrams used the account to share a message about the Black Lives Matter movement.

“We fight for the right to be seen, the right to be heard, and the right to direct the course of history,” she wrote. “Right now we are experiencing a massive cultural change, and history shows that we understand what is at stake: Power.”

RELATED: Selena Gomez-Produced ‘The Broken Hearts Gallery’ To Make Theatrical Debut In July

View this post on Instagram

We fight for the right to be seen, the right to be heard, and the right to direct the course of history. Right now we are experiencing a massive cultural change, and history shows that we understand what is at stake: Power. The United States has always fumbled in its pursuit of social equality, whether it’s stories of police brutality or the invisibility of the disabled community and who we say we are as a country is not currently held up by how our systems behave. But, we have the ability to permanently affect policies and shape the delivery of justice. This is a vision that only comes into being when everyone has a true voice in our futures. We are in a new manifesto for our progressive future, one emboldened by understanding that our time of waiting is over. And I am with you in this fight.⠀ ⠀ — Stacey Abrams (@staceyabrams)

A post shared by Selena Gomez (@selenagomez) on

In a video, Abrams reflected on the 1992 riots following the Rodney King verdict and how the current movement emerged.

“It could have been me,” she said. “Justice does not exist if it is selective.”

Over the weekend, Gomez handed over her account to Ruby Bridges, the first Black child to desegregate the all-white William Frantz Elementary School in Louisiana in 1960.