Ska no more.

This week, the Boston-based band the Mighty Mighty Bosstones announced that they are splitting up after forming nearly 40 years ago.

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The band said in a statement on social media, “We have decided to no longer continue on as a band…. We want to express our sincere gratitude to every single one of you who have supported us.”

No explanation was offered for the split.

The breakup comes amid controversy around the ska punk band in recent days over the song “Heart of Freedom” promoting Robert F. Kennedy’s big Washington, D.C., anti-vaccine rally, which was written by RFK Jr. and appeared to have been produced by Bosstones frontman Dicky Barrett.

In addition to the blowback over the anti-vax connection, RFK Jr. is now facing legal action over the song from Graham Nash, whose 1971 song “Chicago (We Can Change the World)” is interpolated in “Heart of Freedom”.

A rep for the Mighty Mighty Bosstones did not respond to Rolling Stone‘s request for comment on Barrett’s alleged role in creating the song.

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The band formed in 1983, putting out their debut album Devil’s Night Out in 1989. In 1997, they finally achieved massive success with the album Let’s Face It, which featured the breakout single “The Impression That I Get”.

In 2003, the Bosstones took a hiatus, reuniting in 2007 to go on tour and produce new music.

The band also received attention in 2021 for a tribute song dedicated to George Floyd, titled “The Killing of Georgie (Part III)”, in reference to an old Rod Stewart song. The Bosstones’ tribute was met with derision from many online.

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