Lana Condor is getting candid about the effect of the film industry on body image.

In a new interview in the Wondermind newsletter, the “To All the Boys” actor shares how she’s struggled with her own appearance.

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“I think right now positive self-image and self-talk is probably one that I’m working on the most. And that’s a practice that you kind of have to do every day,” Condor says.

“Some of the things that you say to your image, you would never ever say to your best friend or your little sister. So, I try to remind myself of that because I can be pretty hard on my physical appearance. That’s just something that I’ve struggled with all my life.”

The 25-year-old also says that body dysmorphia “is heightened in the entertainment industry”: “I see myself all day long on cameras and monitors and super close up and far behind, and you can’t really escape yourself — and nor do I want to. But if negative self-talk is alive and well in my brain and I can’t escape myself, then I’m miserable.”

Describing herself as a “people pleaser,” Condor says, “The easiest thing that I do to help me unwind after a kind of stressful day is definitely a bath. It forces you to relax. I do like journaling. I read at night. I do a lot of essential oils. Sometimes I’ll go outside and sit with my crystals. And [I] listen to sound baths in the morning and in the night.”

Condor also shared the advice she would give to her younger self on how to deal with all these issues.

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“Share your feelings with someone who feels safe for you. Don’t bottle it up,” she says.

“I bottled it up a lot when I was younger about things that I was going through — and I’m still in it. It took so much time and practice to even 1. identify it, and then 2. to unlearn. I think that if I had felt more safe in terms of sharing whatever was going on with me at that time, I think that it would’ve saved me a lot of time. Of course, it’s always just a journey. It’s an everyday journey, and that’s good. That’s what a practice is.”